Manitoba refugee claimants will be heard via video

FROM METRONEWS.CA

The Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada expanded its hearing spaces in Winnipeg this month, but videoconferencing is still the norm for refugee claimants.

Though Manitoba’s surge of asylum seekers is making international headlines, a local immigration consultant says not enough attention is being paid to how the federal government will process the onslaught of refugee claims.

Rosanna Pancotto, an immigration consultant with Prairie Sky Immigration, said some of her clients have waited up to five years to have their claims dealt with by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB).

“It’s easy to say, let’s process them and they have this photo-op with the RCMP grabbing the kid,” Pancotto said, referring to the now-viral photos of RCMP officers helping a Somali family cross the border into Quebec.

“But the aftermath is what nobody is really talking about.”

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‘They need help’: Surge in donations following swell of asylum-seekers

FROM CBC.CA

At least 22 more refugee claimaints crossed into Manitoba over the weekend

A shirt, a pair of jeans, gloves and a ski mask to cover his face — that was all Farah Ibrhin packed in his small backpack before leaving Minneapolis on a journey to the Canadian border.

A vehicle dropped him and some other asylum-seekers near the Emerson border Saturday night and they started to walk through the deep snow of nearby fields onto Canadian land.

“Nobody was expecting the snow would be deep. Everyone was shocked,” said Ibrhin, who is originally from Somalia.

A woman with a child thought about turning back because the snow was waist-deep, but the group encouraged them on, Ibrhin said.

“We don’t want to go back to America, especially now with Donald Trump and what he is saying to the immigrants, is very terrifying for everyone,” Ibrhin said.

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RCMP get message out in attempt to stem tide of asylum-seekers

FROM WINNIPEGSUN.COM

Manitoba RCMP are not yet turning to a hard-line approach to dealing with the stream of those seeking refugee status in Canada crossing in this border town, but they’re ramping up their message in an attempt to stem the tide.

RCMP officials held court with a variety of media from both Canada and the U.S. on Friday in an attempt to get a message out they hope will curb the number of border-jumpers bypassing the port of entry and crossing illegally in an attempt to escape volatility in the United States.

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Watch As A Canadian News Crew Stumbles Upon A Freezing Refugee Escaping The U.S.A.

FROM THEFADER.COM

The Somali man had been lost in the cold for 21 hours.

Yesterday, CBC’s The National shared this report of a camera crew encountering a man named Mohammad, lying shivering in the snow. He’d taken a 21-hour journey on foot to cross the U.S./Canada border into Emerson, Manitoba, but he wasn’t sure where he was until the crew told him he’s made it. Mohammad was one of 26 people who crossed the border in Emerson that evening alone.

“America is problem now,” Mohammad said in the video. “They take me back home, so my home is not feeling well. Somalia is not like before… Fighting so I can’t go back home.” In the video, Mohammad is quickly taken into custody by police, and will have the chance to claim asylum.

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Canadian lawyers call for change to Safe Third Country Agreement amid influx of refugees

FROM THESTAR.COM

The Canada-U.S. Safe Third Country Agreement bars refugees from seeking asylum in Canada after first landing in the U.S.

Immigration lawyers say they’ve received an influx of requests from refugees in the U.S. hoping to seek asylum in Canada — despite an agreement that makes it nearly impossible.

The Canada-U.S. Safe Third Country Agreement requires people to apply for asylum in the first country where they arrive, unless an immediate family member lives in the other country.

The Canadian government has faced pressure to repeal the agreement since President Donald Trump issued an executive order banning travel and immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries. But Canada’s government has so far refused.

Alastair Clarke, of Clarke Immigration Law in Winnipeg, said that’s a mistake. He said 10 new clients have been referred to him in the last week — some of whom crossed the border on foot, successfully bypassing border points so they could make their refugee claims once already in the country.

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Lawyers call for changes to Safe Third Country Agreement amid refugee influx

FROM CTV NEWS

Immigration lawyers say they’ve received an influx of requests from refugees in the U.S. hoping to seek asylum in Canada — despite an agreement that makes it nearly impossible.

The Canada-U.S. Safe Third Country Agreement requires people to apply for asylum in the first country where they arrive, unless an immediate family member lives in the other country.

The Canadian government has faced pressure to repeal the agreement since President Donald Trump issued an executive order banning travel and immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries. But Canada’s government has so far refused.

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Repeal Safe Third Country Agreement, says Manitoba lawyer

FROM CANADIANLAWYERMAG.COM – LEGALFEEDS

Alastair Clarke says ‘refugees are an economic positive’ for Canada.

Alastair Clarke says ‘refugees are an economic positive’ for Canada.

A Manitoba lawyer who handles refugee claims says more people are coming to Canada due to the rising rhetoric in the United States and Canada needs to act now to suspend the Safe Third Country Agreement.

Challenges facing immigrants and refugees have gained widespread attention since Jan. 27, when Trump suspended the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program for 120 days, and stopped nationals from Yemen, Sudan, Libya, Somalia, Syria, Iran and Iraq from going into the United States for 90 days.

A U.S. federal judge suspended the order last week, and now, the government has a chance to submit legal briefs in support of Trump’s intended policy changes. The battle may end up before the U.S. Supreme Court. 

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