Success: Residency Obligation Appeal

All PRs in Canada should be aware of the 730 day rule re: Residency Obligation. In this case, our clients landed in 2014 while the Principal Applicant was completing his PhD program. They spent 2 weeks in Manitoba and then he returned to finish his degree. He intended to spend only one (1) year outside Canada, complete his studies, and then come back. But his university offered a three (3) year research contract that he could not refuse. He tried to enter Canada in 2018 and the CBSA Officer conducted the examination. As he failed the 730 day rule, he and his family were at risk of losing their Permanent Resident status. They called us and we filed the Residency Obligation appeal to the IAD.Residency Obligations

In the five (5) years prior to examination, these clients were in Canada for only 14 days. This IAD appeal was a challenge. Thankfully, we were able to successfully postpone the IAD hearing date twice and give the family additional time to establish themselves in Manitoba.

We prepared +300 pages of supporting documentation, meticulously drafting each documentation for relevancy and strength. We spent hours to prepare the family and their witnesses to practice (practice and more practice) their testimony.

We won the appeal, of course. Alastair still has a perfect record at the IAD. This was a challenging appeal. With only 14 days in Canada during the requisite period, this family was not even close to meeting the 730 day rule. Thankfully, our legal arguments and preparation won the day. In my view, Canada also gained a prominent academic who is doing significant research. This was a win-win-win!

On a sad note, Alastair spoke with unrepresented appellants at the IAD who decided to try to fight for themselves. Alas, they lost their appeal and they made an appointment at Clarke Immigration Law to discuss their limited options. Please note that appealing an IAD Residency Obligation decision to Federal Court is extremely challenging. I would highly recommend that anyone subject to an IAD appeal find a good lawyer as soon as possible!

Success Stories

Much of our work goes unnoticed. Unreported decisions. Negotiated settlements. Positive decisions rarely make the news and success stories are rarely shared. We certainly encourage our clients to post comments on social media and we are so thankful for their time and energy to share their experiences with our office and to share their success stories. We believe we are the best immigration law firm in Manitoba; however, at the same time, I would not advise you take our word for it. As I say repeatedly at tribunals and at Court, look at the evidence. One piece of objective evidence: we currently have a rating of 4.8 out of 5.0, based on 45 reviews on Google. Many of our clients, however, do not have Google accounts or they do not want to reveal their identities. Fair enough. So our team will make an effort to share these successes with you on our website. I want to say that these success stories are personal stories from our clients so we will be omitting any confidential and/or identifying information.

Success Stories

Success Stories

We had a staff meeting to discuss this effort and I think everyone at Clarke Law is excited to share our successes. We are pleased to announce that we will start sharing success stories in this space on a regular basis. We also feel much of the excitement (and anxiety) as our clients when we get positive decisions. This project will give you, wherever you are in the world, insight into some of the cases we handle and how we achieve our results.

We simply do not have the resources to help all the people who contact our office. We try our best to give sound advice and relevant information. Part of our job is to dispel misinformation and disinformation. Alas, there is a plethora of out-dated information or incorrect information online. I will say that part of me cringes when I hear a client say, “my friend told me …”. More often than not, the individual then goes on to describe a situation that is quite different from their circumstances.

From my perspective, we are motivated to save lives, to bring families together and to build Canadian businesses. This means bringing family members to Canada so they can work or study or visit. We have helped countless international students who were previously refused based on poor representation or mistakes.

I remember when I asked my father about sponsoring my mother back in the 1960s. He can barely remember the application. At that time, Canadian immigration was a simple system and the applications were thin. He did not have to deal with complex system we deal with today. As my mum was dealing with an intense political situation, I am not certain that their application would have been straight-forward.

We will try to share some of our success stories; however, time is our greatest resource and it is also a resource in short supply. We need to balance our time between updating this site and helping the clients who trust us to solve their immigration problems.

Poem for 2020

Here at Clarke Immigration Law, we try to have fun while we are working hard for our clients. For our end of year party, my colleague Kieran Szuchewycz wrote the following poem and he has graciously allowed us to publish this on our website. Enjoy!

In fourteen hundred ninety two

Columbus sailed the ocean blue

In two thousand and twenty he came once more

And landed north on Canadian shores

And as he stepped off his Iberian plane

With a thunderous voice he did proclaim

“This land now belongs to the king of Spain”

 

But a lot has changed in 500 years

Empires have crumbled and new borders appeared

And while jet wings are faster than sails

IRCC processing times would frustrate a snail

And unbeknownst to Columbus

A flag stuck in the sand

Would not grant him entry

Into this, most exotic of lands

 

So as Columbus kneeled down

Thanking god for safe journey

In rushed Minister Marco Mendicino

Dragging him off in a hurry

 

He seized his compass, pistol and feather plumbed hat

Unplanted Spain’s flag from the damaged tarmac

“Resist and I’ll give you a zap in the back!”

“But I’m Columbus” he cried, “and that is a fact”

 

The Minister hesitated,

“Alright then Columbus please explain the purpose of your stay

And show me some ID or I’ll send you away”

 

“Well” said the explorer

“I don’t have any passport per se

But that shouldn’t really cause any delay

Why make a big deal I’m already here anyway

Plus I’ll probably head home in a couple of days”

 

Minister Mendicino barked

“That’s hullaballoo

I’m the border’s bulldog and you ain’t getting through,

I’m only going to ask once more so stay true

Why did you come to Canada?

Tell me what will you to do?”

 

Columbus, now shaken, answered carefully

“Well I fell in love with a woman in Canada see

We’ll soon be engaged and then be married

So we must to be reunited under IRPA section 3(d)

In addition to that please refer to section 3 (g)

Because, I’ll be enrolling as a student at the U of T,

And, did I mention I’ve already earned a prestigious degree?

Once it’s translated I’m sure you’ll agree

That my skills are well suited for the work as it be

In this land of the true north strong and free”

 

“And please consider the strife on my native soil

Where the people know nothing but sorrow and toil

The police never act without a bribe in their hand

And my beliefs, my opinions have been unjustly banned

Why, against a cruel tyrant I took a brave stand

And I’ve risked everything to reach this O Promised Land”

 

“And if that’s not enough I’ve got money to spend

I’ll be investing millions in a business

On which countless Canadian jobs will depend

So all of that combined with my lovely lady friend

Surely my entry to Canada you will personally recommend”

 

The Minister took notes of what Columbus had said,

Then delivered his decision whilst shaking his head,

 

“Listen close you so-called explorer

I will never let you cross this damn border

Are you unable to understand the nature of these proceedings?

Or are you misrepresenting facts and being purposefully misleading?

You’re a burden, a risk, your refugee claims are dismissible

Reviewing these facts I find you inadmissible

 

So friends,

 

The lesson of this story is plain to see

Expect a fierce storm of questions at your port of entry

It’s forced more to turn back than bad weather at sea

So have your forms filled and your responses ready

And should this tempest surpass your best preparation

You need only reach out for a hand from Clarke Immigration

 

Lessons From 2019

We find ourselves at the end of another year. Indeed, the end of 2019 also marks the end of a decade. This is a time for contemplation and an opportunity to ponder lessons to learn for the future. I want to start but expressing my thanks and gratitude for my team. I am thankful every single day to work with an amazing group of professionals who put their hearts into their work. My main job is to provide guidance and support to ensure that we remain focused on providing the absolute best service for our clients.

I want to take time at the end of 2019 to think about lessons learned; hopefully, 2020 will bring positive change.

  1. Applicants Remain Vulnerable

Over and over and over and over, we have seen how applicants have paid thousands upon thousands of CAD dollars to shady representatives for poor service. I find it deeply frustrating and infuriating to see clients punished as a result of negligence. These applicants are the victims and they remain vulnerable. I recently attended an interview with a CBSA Officer and an Egyptian client shared her story. She paid an immigration consultant $15,000.00 for an application and she was not even eligible to apply. In my view, that is pure theft.

We are working with a Vietnamese family who paid a Chinese representative for a Study Permit. Completely wrong. Thankfully, CBSA started a criminal investigation against him and I hope his former clients are not punished.

In 2019, the Government of Canada took action “to help protect vulnerable people” against “fraudulent immigration consultants”. We will have to see if things get better in 2020 and the next decade.

  1. Canada is the New Hope2019

Clarke Immigration Law is based on Canada’s status around the world and I am constantly reminded how fortunate we are to live in one of the best (if not the best) countries. From our office, this past decade marks a strong collaboration with the news. We were called upon by CBC News, CTV News, Global News, Winnipeg Free Press and many other news sources to comment on different stories. Primarily, these stories stemmed from Canada as the New Hope in the world, replacing the United States as the “best” country for applicants from around the globe.

It was my pleasure as the only Canadian lawyer at the international EB-5 Conference in Las Vegas, USA. I was asked to present as a result of the interest by investors around the world in Canadian business opportunities, including the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program – Business Investor Stream. And, of course, I must mention the amazing people at TEDx Winnipeg who gave me the stage to talk about open borders and refugees which has been published on YouTube.

It is clear that 2020 will be a decade of growth for Canada and we will continue to work to build this country.

  1. Hope for the Best, Plan for the Worst

Generally speaking, I stay out of politics. I have worked with Members of Parliament from all political parties and we will continue to advocate on behalf of our client regardless of the party in power. That said, I firmly support the current Liberal government and I am hopeful for this coming decade.

My hope for positive political change in 2020 is also balanced with a plan to consider the worst. Minister McCallum made significant changes to IRPA that rolled back many of the inhumane changes by the former Conservative government; however, this government needs to do more. I feel privileged that we were able to work with the Liberal government to make changes to section 38 of IRPA (Medical Inadmissibility) on behalf of the Warkentin family.

  1. Uncertainty on the Horizon

As my mum often says, the only constant is change. There is no doubt that 2020 and the new decade will bring change. Here are a few predictions for this coming decade:

  • The Government of Canada and the Government of Manitoba will continue to buttress immigration laws to attract STEM graduates and professionals;
  • The current Liberal government will focus on quicker processing times, including Family Class applications;
  • Regional migration and new programs that focus on smaller communities will thrive;
  • International students are the strongest stream for Permanent Resident status;
  • Refugees will be recognized for their economic contributions;
  • The changes to regulation of Immigration Consultants will fail and the government will be forced to revisit this issue.

We wish you all the best for 2020 and the coming decade. We have many reasons to celebrate 2019 and, at the same time, learn from past lessons.

Sponsor Parents – 2020

UPDATE (12 DEC 2019): I have spoken with my colleagues and IRCC will be opening this program at the end of JAN 2020; however, they are planning a different system to select applications. For more information, please contact our office directly.

IRCC has announced in December 2019 that Parents and Grandparents may be eligible to sponsor in 2020. This comes after the Liberal Government was reelected and they are continuing with their previous election promise to reunite parents and grandparents in Canada. The previous Conservative government suspended this sponsorship application and replaced this program with the Super Visa.

Based on current information, the program to sponsor parents or grandparents will reopen at the beginning of 2020. Sponsors must an “interest to sponsor” form immediately after the program reopens. We expect this application to sponsor parents will be as popular as previous years. Previously, the IRCC website shut down after approximately 10 minutes only.Sponsor Parents

If you plan to sponsor parents or grandparents, please retain our office to help with the interest to sponsor form. Our fees for this service are only $500.00 CAD and we will have staff prepared to submit these forms as quickly as possible. All our fees are published on our website and we would encourage you to review the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ).

Only sponsors and applicants who submit the interest to sponsor form in time will have the opportunity to submit a full application in 2020. At that point, we can assist to prepare the full application. There is a 60 day deadline to submit the full application. Based on previous experience with these applications, if a family is not eligible and/or the applicant is inadmissible for any reason, IRCC will contact the next potential applicants.

We can only assist a limited number of families in this process. We would strongly encourage you to have your file opened and set up in DEC 2019 to ensure the best chance of being selected in early 2020 when the program reopens. Please contact us immediately if you would like assistance to sponsor parents or grandparents.

Toronto firm charges $170k in fees

Another investigation has uncovered unfair and abusive fees charged by a Canadian immigration firm. The Toronto firm WonHonTa Consulting offered immigration solutions for their clients without disclosing any fees. CBC News uncovered a scheme where clients were charged $170,000 CAD for Permanent Resident status.

At this point, we cannot comment on whether WonHonTa Consulting is criminal; however, it is clearly in violation of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) and these clients are potentially subject to misrepresentation per section 40 of IRPA. These clients may be banned from Canada for 5 years.

Misrepresentation

  • 40(1) A permanent resident or a foreign national is inadmissible for misrepresentation
    • (a)for directly or indirectly misrepresenting or withholding material facts relating to a relevant matter that induces or could induce an error in the administration of this Act;

The keyword above is “indirectly”. This means that clients and/or applicants are caught by any mistakes made by their representatives, even in cases where they may not be aware of the information submitted on their behalf.

Buyer Beware

So the first mistake these clients of this Toronto firm made was to hire this shady firm. The CBC investigations revealed many red flags:

A Toronto immigration company offered a job to an undercover CBC journalist posing as a Chinese national seeking permanent residence in Canada for $170,000.

For that fee, WonHonTa Consulting Inc. said, the would-be immigrant would be buying the job and paying their own wage. Toronto firm

And the company said the applicant was to pay the fee to the personal bank account of WonHonTa’s sole director in order to avoid taxes.

Jiacheng Song, a manager with a China-based affiliate of WonHonTa, Nanjing Youtai Investment Consulting Co. Ltd., explained how the business works to the undercover journalist using WeChat, a Chinese social media app.

During the month-long investigation conducted through a translator, the journalist posed as a Chinese citizen wanting to become a permanent resident of Canada by obtaining skilled employment.

“To be frank, we have employers who work with us,” Song wrote. “We pay them money, they are willing to sponsor our clients for immigration.”

Clearly, this job is fake. The scheme is fake. The applicants who hire the Toronto firm are the victims.

Clear and Transparent Fees

When we started Clarke Immigration Law, we sought to run our firm differently from other law firms. Unlike other firms, we publish our legal fees online. We provide excellent services and we work to get the best results. We do not charge excessive fees. These are the values of our firm.

I have spoken with many other lawyers about publishing fees. I have heard these excuses:

  • A lawyer who serves Chinese clients quotes them much more than other clients. If he charges too little, they do not believe that he provides quality services.
  • For example, he will charge $8,000.00 for a Spousal Sponsorship (he is in Vancouver and his fees are higher than Winnipeg) for a non-Chinese couple. He will charge $12,000.00 for the same application for Chinese clients.
  • His justification is that high fees equal good service. This is simply not true.

I strongly advise clients to retain legal firms who publish their fees online. Lawyers are taught in law school the importance of transparency and predictability of the law. Canada is a common law country (save Quebec) with a history of upholding precedence; however, these principles do not seem to apply to the relationship between clients and their representatives. Lawyers do not practice what they preach. They want courts and decision-makers to provide clear reasons; however, legal fees are often completely arbitrary.

I have seen arbitrary fees charged at other law firms. The lawyer will demand a certain retainer, for example $2,000, and open a file. Then, as the file progresses, the “new” issues will arise in the same legal matter and the lawyer will charge additional fees.

Expensive Consultants

The CBC report clearly shows that immigration consultants may not be cheaper than lawyers. This Toronto firm was clearly over-charging their clients:

Song recommended the undercover journalist consider either Saskatchewan or Atlantic Canada because the qualification requirements are low and the wait times are short. He said it’s $180,000 for a job in Saskatchewan or $170,000 for the Atlantic provinces.

Song told the undercover reporter that over the past year his company had placed more than a dozen Chinese nationals in Atlantic Canada and just under ten in Saskatchewan.

I am not aware of any of these cases in Manitoba.

 

Nigerian Professionals in Manitoba Presentation

It was my pleasure to present to the Nigerian Professionals in Manitoba (NPIM) group. This is a group of ~600 Nigerians in the province who support each other and share ideas. I will say that the group was extremely engaged and attentive. Thank you so much for the invitation and I hope to see everyone again.

NPIM

Over the course of my presentation, here are some of the points covered:

  • Tips and tricks with MPNP applications
  • Supporting relatives and family members abroad through provincial programs
  • Inviting relatives and friends through federal programs, including visas
  • Pathways to Permanent Resident status
  • Compare US immigration law with Canadian immigration law
  • Residency requirements for PRs in Canada
  • PRs who work abroad for Canadian companies
  • Sponsoring spouses when the sponsor is currently married
  • Tips for bringing parents to Canada
  • Navigating the world of Designated Learning Institutions – private versus public
  • Working in Nigeria after PR status
  • Processing times for MPNP applicants – how to speed up the process
  • “Illegal aliens” in the US – what does that mean in Canada?
  • Bringing family members from the USA to Canada

The audience was very engaged and we had a great time. I would estimate that there were ~40 to 50 people in attendance and I thoroughly enjoyed meeting and getting to know these professionals who clearly seek to better themselves, their families and their community.

For more information about the Nigerian Professionals in Manitoba, please visit their website here. A description of the group:

Nigerians who call Manitoba home are excellent contributors to the growth of the region with their expertise. They are actors, accountants, analysts, artists, authors, dentists, educators, engineers, entertainers, entrepreneurs, designers, teachers, medical doctors, musicians, pastors, publishers, nurses. They are engaged in many other areas as skilled workers, in science and technology, and the transportation industry. They are also financial consultants, bankers, special-needs experts, trainers and care-givers. Nigerians in Manitoba are working a variety of professions, keeping Manitoba moving.

I look forward to presenting to the Nigerian Professionals in Manitoba in the future. We ran out of time! Too many questions!

CBA Immigration Conference

For the hundreds of CBA immigration lawyers, welcome to Winnipeg! This year, we are hosting the national CBA conference from 30 MAY 2019 to 1 JUNE 2019. I have received many emails and messages from lawyers across Canada who have arrived early to explore Winnipeg. Enjoy!

Winnipeg boasts many amazing culinary spots in some very cool neighbourhoods. Here is a selection of some of our favourite restaurants:

The above is a short selection of some of the amazing destinations in Winnipeg. Apologies to all the places that we have not included. Personally, I also love VJ’s and a bunch of smaller places. Hopefully, the +500 attendees for this CBA national conference will get out and explore!

On the immigration side, welcome to Minister Hussen! I look forward to hearing your opening remarks on 31 MAY 2019. There are many significant issues and proposed changes to IRPA/ IRPR. As a CBA Member, we look forward to working with your office and the department for the best interests of applicants and our amazing country!

Here is a description of the conference from the CBA:

The CBA Immigration Law Conference is Canada’s premiere conference on immigration, refugee and citizenship law – where lawyers, judges and public employees at the front-line of immigration practice and policy-making share their knowledge and experience.

The 2019 conference will examine the role of immigration lawyers in achieving Canada’s ongoing objectives to promote justice and security, reunite families, and maximize social, cultural, and economic benefits of immigration.

WELCOME TO WINNIPEG!

Bill C-97 – Changes to IRPA

CONCERNS REGARDING PROPOSED CHANGES IN BILL C-97

Dear Sir or Madam:

On behalf of residents and organizations in Manitoba who deal directly with immigrants and refugees, we have serious concerns regarding the amendments proposed in Bill C-97. The focus of the comments below relate to the changes to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (hereinafter IRPA) specifically. On a procedural note, however, we have serious concerns with the way that the Liberal Government is pushing for significant changes to Canadian laws without proper parliamentary debate.

Genuine Refugees in Manitoba

The vast majority of refugee claimants in Manitoba enter our jurisdiction after they have started an asylum claim in the United States. These claimants are from many countries, including Somalia, Djibouti, Nigeria, Venezuela, the Democratic Republic of Congo. Based on our collective experience, most of these claimants are, in fact, successful with their claims at the Immigration and Refugee Board (hereinafter “IRB”) and they are found to be genuine refugees. The highly skilled adjudicators at the IRB consider the claims based on sections 96 and 97 of IRPA. In addition, they assess the credibility of the claimants and they consider evidence from the United States and any other country where they have sought protection.

The proposed changes to Section 101.1 of IRPA will significant affect many claimants in Manitoba. Claimants who have made a claim for refugee protection in the United States and any of the Five Eyes countries will not be eligible to have their refugee claims heard at the IRB. Instead, Bill C-97 proposes that these individuals will have a risk assessment done as part of a Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA).

We have concerns that the proposed changes will affect genuine refugees who are seeking the protection of Canada, in accordance with Canadian laws and our international obligations.

The Proposed Changes May be Unconstitutional

We have concerns that banning refugee claimants from the tribunal and, instead, having their risk assessment done by a PRRA Officer is unconstitutional and a breach of Charter Rights. As noted by the Supreme Court of Canada in the Singh decision, the previous system that involved public servants making refugee decisions was unconstitutional; hence, the creation of the IRB.

We have concerns that many claimants in Manitoba will be in long-term limbo. Foreign nationals who are coming from so-called “moratorium countries” may be banned from filing a PRRA application. If they are banned from both the tribunal as well as the PRRA application, they will be living in Manitoba in limbo. They cannot be removed to their home countries and they cannot easily regularize their status. These individuals may be forced to make applications based on humanitarian and compassionate circumstances per Section 25 of IRPA. Currently, the processing time for that application is 30 months and these people will be long-term limbo during this time.

Potential Impact on Mental Health

We have concerns that the mental health of refugee claimants is not being sufficiently considered. All of us seek to provide the necessary support for individuals in Manitoba who are coming from countries where they may have experienced trauma, torture or persecution. The IRB has robust measures, including Chairperson’s Guidelines and the Adjudicators receive significant training on dealing with vulnerable persons and individuals who have faced trauma.

We have concerns that the proposed changes to not adequately consider the potential negative impact on the mental health who are coming to Canada seeking protection.

Positive Change

We live in a parliamentary democracy, based on debate and discussion. We have concerns that Bill C-97 has been tabled without due process. We would support changes to IRPA that adequately consider the circumstances of the individuals and the families that we assist on a daily basis.

As Manitobans, we are proud of Canada’s humanitarian tradition and we work hard to build our communities based on diversity and multiculturalism. The refugee determination system in Canada must also reflect our values to properly consider each claim and assess the merits of refugee claimants according to our Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Thank you for your time and consideration,

Alastair Clarke – Clarke Immigration Law

Abdikheir Ahmed – Immigration Partnership Winnipeg

Lisa Forbes – Amnesty International Canada

Louise Simbadumwe – Amnesty International Canada

Dorota Blumczynska – Immigrant and Refugee Community of Manitoba (IRCOM)

Dr. Shauna Labman – Assistant Professor of Law, University of Manitoba

Ghezae Hagos – Manitoba Interfaith Immigration Council

Bequie Lake – Manitoba Association of Newcomer Serving Organizations

Carol Reimer (IRCOM)

Yahya Samatar – Former Refugee

Razak Iyal – Former Refugee

 

2019 Legal Fees

Here at Clarke Immigration Law, we want to ensure that we provide the best quality of service for reasonable fees. This is extremely important to us, as we are service providers. It is also extremely important that our clients understand exactly what they are paying for. You work hard for your money and you should expect legal fees in line with those expectations. Based on our research, we are the ONLY immigration law firm in Manitoba that publishes most of our legal fees on our website. These fees are calculated based on knowledge of our knowledge of immigration firms’ fees from Manitoba and Ontario, minus 20%. We want to pass along the savings to our clients. At the same time, we also provide the best possible quality of service because we know how important your applications are. We treat our clients like family and, just as family, we do not want you to suffer under huge legal bills.

Canadian Lawyer Magazine released its 2019 results for legal fees across Canada. These results are based on national averages. Some firms charge more, while others charge less. Clarke Immigration Law is pleased to report that our fees are in line with national averages. Across the board, you can see that we have met and/or exceeded expectations. Thank you to CLM for confirming that our legal fees put our clients first!

Legal Fees

To be clear, CLM has only published the average amounts for four (4) different types of applications: 1. Work Permits; 2. Family Class sponsorship (includes Spousal Sponsorship, both regular stream and SCLPC Class, Dependent Children and sponsorship applications for Parents and Grandparents); 3. Express Entry application, which would include the initial application; 3. Refugee Protection claim, which would include representation at the RPD.

Here is the above information in a clear chart:

SERVICES – CLM FEES – NATIONAL AVERAGE
Work Permit $2,501 – $3,000
Family Class sponsorship $5,601 – $6,000
Express Entry less than $3,700
Refugee Protection Claim $4,901 – $5,500

For comparison, our fees are published below:

SERVICES – CLARKE IMMIGRATION LAW BLOCK FEES
Work Permit $1,800
Family Class sponsorship $5,500
Express Entry $1,800
Refugee Protection Claim starting at $3,500

Please note that the fees quoted above are current as of 8 APRIL 2019 and may change at any time. In addition, the fees quoted above are based on cases where there are no previous refusals. Contact us directly if you have any questions and/or you would like to retain our services.

The last point that I would like to mention is the fact that only 28% of immigration law firms accept Legal Aid Certificates. On a personal note, this is a sore point. I strongly believe that immigration services should be provided by the government. Lawyers in BC planned to take job action starting 1 APR 2019 as the tariffs for legal aid are not sufficient. Tariffs in Manitoba are even worse than in BC and when I started this firm in 2015, many lawyers advised that I should not take Legal Aid Certificates. I decided, however, that is not the right thing to do.

Approximately 30% of the files at Clarke Immigration Law are on Legal Aid Certificates. You should be aware, however, that when you retain Clarke Immigration Law on a private retainer with the fees above, you are also helping to support our clients who are on Legal Aid Certificates. The only way we can accept Legal Aid Certificates and pay our bills is through our work on private retainers. For any lawyers reading this, I would strongly urge you to adopt this model. We need to put our clients first. Keep up the good fight!